Miles Simmons

85 Reputation

3 Badges

0 years, 337 days

MaplePrimes Activity


These are Posts that have been published by

Who else likes art?  I love art; doodling in my notebook between projects and classes is a great way to pass the time and keep my creativity sharp.  However, when I’m working in Maple Learn, I don’t need to get out my book; I can use the plot window as my canvas and get my drawing fix right then and there.

We’ve done a few blog posts on Maple Learn art, and we’re back at it again in even bigger and better ways.  Maple Learn’s recent update added some useful features that can be incorporated into art, including the ability to resize the plot window and animate using automatically-changing variables.

Even with all the previous posts, you may be thinking, “What’s all this?  How am I supposed to make art in a piece of math software?”  Well, there is a lot of beauty to mathematics.  Consider beautiful patterns and fractals, equations that produce surprisingly aesthetically interesting outputs, and the general use of mathematics to create technical art.  In Maple Learn, you don’t have to get that advanced (heck, unless you want to).  Art can be created by combining basic shapes and functions into any image you can imagine.  All of the images below were created in Maple Learn!

There are many ways you can harness artistic power in Maple Learn.  Here are the resources I recommend to get you started.

  1. I’ve recently made some YouTube videos (see the first one below) that provide a tutorial for Maple Learn art.  This series is less than 30 minutes in total, and covers - in three respective parts - the basics, some more advanced Learn techniques, and a full walkthrough of how I make my own art.
  2. Check out the Maple Learn document gallery art collection for some inspiration, the how-to documents for additional help, and the rest of the gallery to see even more Maple Learn in action!

Once you’re having fun and making art, consider submitting your art to the Maple Conference 2022 Maple Learn Art Showcase.  The due date for submission is October 14, 2022.  The Conference itself is on November 2-3, and is a free virtual event filled with presentations, discussions, and more.  Check it out!

 

If you do as much math as I do, you’ll likely agree that it’s important to take breaks from intensive work.  However, sometimes one wants to keep one’s mind stimulated with math.  This makes mathematical puzzles and games a perfect respite.  Alternatively, even if you don’t do as much math professionally, math puzzles are a fun and easily-accessible way to keep your mind sharp.  Games like sudoku and Rubik’s cubes are incredibly popular for good reason.

My personal favourite math puzzle is the nonogram, sometimes called hanjie, picross, or picture cross.  The game presents players with a blank grid of squares and clues indicating which ones should be colored in.  When the puzzle is solved, the colored squares depict a simple image.  You can read more thorough instructions here.

 


Nonograms are now available in Maple Learn!  These documents are coded using Maple scripts which can be viewed online in Maple Learn.  The document collection has pre-made puzzles and randomly-generated puzzles, and now you can create your own!  Use this document to create an image, and follow the instructions therein to generate the interactive puzzle.  Once you’ve created your own Maple Learn nonogram, use the sharelink to send it to friends!  Also keep your eye on the entire Maple Learn games collection for more in the future!

Probability is a field of mathematics that sees extensive use outside of academics.  Whether one’s checking the likelihood of rain on a weather app or the odds of winning the lottery, probability is everywhere.  My favorite application of probability is dice games like Dungeons and Dragons.  The game can be played very simply (choose to attack a monster, roll a 20-sided-die, try to exceed a certain number) or with a complexity that rivals high school math courses.  There are spells and abilities that modify one’s dice rolls, such as adding additional rolls to the total or rerolling the die and using the higher result.  A good player regularly asks themself when to activate certain buffs and how likely they are to succeed with or without them.

All of these questions boil down to the basics of probability.  Things that one learns in an introductory statistics course extend into countless applications.  Currently, I’m adding some of that knowledge to the Maple Learn document gallery, and I’m here to give a sneak peek.

First, I’ve built tree diagrams in Maple Learn.  Tree diagrams are a way to map probability across multiple events occurring in sequence.  Each branching path represents a series of events that have a specified probability of occurring.

Here’s an example: one morning I flip a coin to decide if I buy a lottery ticket.  If it’s heads, I do.  If I buy the ticket, I have a one in a million chance of winning the cash prize.  Drawn as a tree diagram…

I drew this using Maple Learn line, point, and label operations.

My new D&D-themed documents are a bit more exciting.  In the first, we explore a tree diagram with variable probabilities.  A brave hero makes their way into a dungeon, attacking any random monster they see.  How likely are they to land an attack?  Adjust the details of the question and watch the diagram change.


In the second, I used Maple program scripting to add a live randomized dice roller.  Many probability techniques are at play to analyze which of two buffs will do more good for a dice-rolling adventurer.

I plan on making more documents like these; keep your eyes on the Document Gallery probability collection for updates.

Les probabilités sont  un domaine des mathématiques largement utilisé en dehors des universités. Que l'on vérifie la probabilité de l’apparition de la pluie sur une application météo ou les chances de gagner à la loterie, les probabilités sont partout. Mon application des probabilités préférée est les jeux de dés comme Donjons et Dragons. Le jeu peut se jouer très simplement (choisir d'attaquer un monstre, lancer un dé à 20 faces, essayer de dépasser un certain nombre) ou avec une complexité qui rivalise avec les cours de mathématiques du lycée. Il existe des sorts et des capacités qui modifient les lancés de dés, comme ajouter des lancés supplémentaires au total ou relancer le dé et utiliser le résultat le plus élevé. Un bon joueur se demande régulièrement quand activer certains « buffs » et quelle est la probabilité qu'ils réussissent avec ou sans eux.

Toutes ces questions se résument aux bases des probabilités. Les choses que l'on apprend dans un cours d'introduction aux statistiques s'étendent à d'innombrables applications. Actuellement, j'ajoute certaines de ces connaissances à la galerie de documents Maple Learn je voulais vous en donner un aperçu.

Tout d'abord, j'ai construit des arbres de probabilité avec Maple Learn. Ceux-ci permettent de représenter graphiquement la probabilité de plusieurs événements se produisant en séquence. Chaque chemin de branchement représente une série d'événements qui ont une probabilité de se produire spécifique.

Voici un exemple : un matin, je lance une pièce pour décider si j'achète un billet de loterie. Si c'est face, je le fais. Si j'achète le billet, j'ai une chance sur un million de gagner l’argent. Dessiné sous forme d'arbre de probabilité…

J'ai dessiné ceci en utilisant les fonctionnalités ligne, point et étiquette de Maple Learn.

Mes nouveaux documents sur le thème de D&D sont un peu plus intéressants. Dans le premier, nous explorons un arbre de probabilités variables. Un héros courageux se rend dans un donjon, attaquant n'importe quel monstre aléatoire qu'il voit. Quelle est la probabilité qu'ils lancent une attaque ? Ajustez les détails de la question et regardez le diagramme changer.

Dans le second, j'ai utilisé la fonction script de Maple pour ajouter un lanceur de dés aléatoire en direct. De nombreuses techniques de probabilité sont en jeu pour analyser lequel des deux « buffs » fera le plus de bien à un aventurier qui lance les dés.

Je prévois de faire plus de documents comme ceux-ci; gardez un œil sur la catégorie de probabilités dans la galerie de documents Maple Learn pour les mises à jour.

Récemment, j’ai assisté à une présentation sur comment utiliser Maple Learn pour créer des documents artistiques et aujourd’hui  je vous écris pour vous donner mes conseils sur ce sujet. Maple Learn a beaucoup de fonctionnalités permettant de créer des documents visuels tout en étant un outil parfait pour faire vos devoirs.

Caractéristique 1 : Les formes

 Le premier document artistique de cette collection, le « Pi Pie » a été créé en utilisant la palette géométrie de Maple Learn. Elle fournit des modèles pour tracer des formes géométriques de façon plus simple. Le plus important dans ce document est l’utilisation de « Polygon() » pour créer le symbole pi. Insérez le nombre de points que vous voulez entre les parenthèses et le graphique connectera les points dans l’ordre entre eux. J’ai dessiné le symbole de pi sur un papier graphique et j’ai copié les points dans Maple Learn. C’est beaucoup d’effort, mais je pense que l’effet créé en vaut la peine.

 

Caractéristique 2 : Les fonctions

Ce personnage se nomme Milo je l’ai créé au lycée. Avec Maple Learn je l’ai reproduit en utilisant avec uniquement des fonctions. Voyons cela plus en détails :

  • La tête et les cheveux sont des fonctions paramétriques. Les personnes  se souvenant de leur cours de maths savent que (x, y) = (cos(t), sin(t)) est la formule d’ un cercle unitaire. Nous pouvons modifier l ‘étendue de t, les coefficients avant sin(t) et cos(t) et additionner ou soustraire les constantes pour créer des cercles partielles ou des ellipses.
  • Les yeux grisés sont fait avec des inégalités. Maple Learn permet de griser des régions d’inégalités automatiquement.
  • Le sourire de Milo est l’équation d’un cercle limité par “| y < -0.5”. L’opérateur barre  « such that » vous permet de limiter le domaine et l’étendue d’une fonction.
  • Le cœur vient d’une formule trouvée en ligne. Les mathématiciens ont découvert beaucoup d’équations incrédules de ce type !

Caractéristique 3 : L’animation

Mon document artistique final permet de voir germer une jolie fleur lorsque l’on utilise le curseur de la barre de défilement.  Après avoir défini une variable dans Maple Learn, la barre de défilement apparait et permet l’ajustement de la valeur de la variable. Par exemple :

  • Associez les coordonnées d’un point avec une variable. Évaluez une fonction à un point correspondant à cette variable et voyez comment lorsque la variable change, le point se déplace.
  • Associez l’étendue  d’une fonction paramétrique à une variable. Quand la variable change la fonction s’étend ou se contracte.
  • Utilisez une variable avec une fonction par morceaux. Quand la variable est dans la gamme lui correspondant vous pouvez la visualiser.

Les mathématiques sont une belle langue et chaque type d’expression peut ajouter un plus à votre toile. Mes techniques ne sont que le début de belles pièces d’arts dans Maple Learn. Montrez-nous vos documents artistiques ou vos techniques dans les commentaires !

1 2 Page 1 of 2